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News

COVID-19: College Students To Sub For Teachers In Quarantine

COVID-19 in schools, photo illustration
COVID-19 in schools, photo illustration Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/By Gobierno de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, CC BY 2.5 ar, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=96514996

Connecticut is seeking to use college and university students to fill staffing gaps at public schools reeling from COVID-19 infections.

On Tuesday, Dec. 1, Gov. Ned Lamont expounded on a plan to recruit college students to work as substitute teachers, either on a volunteer or paid basis, in the state's public schools.

The state has had to get creative due to a lack of available teachers during the pandemic.

The requirement that people exposed to COVID-19 quarantine for 14 days has left many schools in Connecticut and neighboring Massachusetts short-staffed. With not enough faculty and staff to supervise students, some schools - including those in Middletown, West Haven, New Haven, and Shelton - have transitioned to remote education to keep the school year going.

Connecticut has already partnered with Central Connecticut State University to recruit student substitutes through a program they’re calling NextGen Educators. The university is offering this opportunity primarily to students in its early education program. 

Under normal circumstances, substitute teachers in Connecticut public schools must have a bachelor’s degree.

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