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Nassau Daily Voice serves Glen Cove, Hempstead, Long Beach, North Hempstead & Oyster Bay

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Lifestyle

Split-Level Third Generation Lives In Same Wantagh Family Home Grandfather Bought In 1956

A traditional side split level home
A traditional side split level home Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

So many Long Islanders grew up in a split-level house and some still live in the ones they were raised in.

Stephanie Anderson and her two grown sons live in the home her parents bought in 1956 for $17,000 and where she and her brothers Stewart and Dean Chakiry also grew up in..

The classic mid-century house style which was built up to the 1970s has staggered levels, with usually two short sets of stairs, one running upward to a bedroom level, and one going downward toward a basement or "den" area. 

"Their mortgage payments were $104 a month. They looked at Levitts which were half the price but my mom fell in love with the split," said Anderson. 

Her house is in a development that also has Levitt sections. Both her parents, Kay and Chris Chakiry were WW2 veterans. They had a dream of raising a family on Long Island." Kay and Chris were the original owners of the house.

 When they approached retirement, instead of selling and moving, they wanted to travel so they offered Anderson and her husband Kermitt the opportunity to take out a mortgage of our own to pay off their home equity loan and finance construction on the house.

"We converted the house into a mother/daughter. My dad's long term plan was for my mom to be taken care of after he was gone. We lived as a multigenerational family for many years. My boys went to the same schools that I did."

Sadly though Anderson's mother died first, then her father, a year later in 2014. "He was heartbroken," she said. The whole reason for converting the mother-daughter was to take care of her mother.

"What my father couldn't have predicted was that my husband Kermitt Anderson would unexpectedly pass away from a pulmonary embolism two years later in 2017," Anderson said.

"My house is paid off and even though his plan for mom didn't work out, ultimately my 2 sons and I have a place to live due to Chris Chakirys long term planning."

"This house is my little slice of Earth and I don't intend on moving away anytime soon."

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